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Labor Day


Labor Day is a federal holiday in the United States celebrated on the first Monday in September in any given year (i.e. a single day from September 1 through September 7) to honor and recognize the American labor movement and the works and contributions of laborers to the development and achievements of the United States.


Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. By the time it became an official federal holiday in 1894, thirty states in the United States officially celebrated Labor Day.


Perhaps this year we must especially celebrate all those who labor in our hospitals, those who are first responders, electrical line men and women, those who labor in our grocery stores and restaurants, those who labor in our fields, often without protection from sun or rain.


Loving God,

bless those who labor,

who work for the weal of the world.

For those whose unseen labor eases our lives,

may we always be mindful and grateful.

For their diligence and pride in craft

and faithful service we render thanks.

For those who work for the sake

of people they will never see,

we ask your blessing.

For those who risk and suffer,

we ask your protection.

For those whose work is demeaning,

whose conditions are poor,

whose pay is unfair,

we pray for justice.

We give honor to those whose labor

is unseen and unrewarded.

We pray for those whose labor is forced,

without rest, or freedom or dignity;

for all who are coerced, endangered, enslaved,

exploited or abused: we cry for justice.

We pray for those who seek labor

and who find none,

who are prevented by their bodies

or their society from meaningful work.

We give thanks for all who labor,

and pray that all may know the blessing

of your Sabbath gift of rest.

Holy One, you who labor for our life,

bless our work, that it may serve you

and the mending of the world.

Amen. (Source)